Philosophy

My philosophy and my manner of working go hand in hand. I put a great deal of emphasis on clear communication between the winemakers and myself: what are their desires, their hopes, their goals and their resources.

We study together the potential of their terroir (in the event that they are not yet totally in command of it).  I adapt my methods to each winemaker, of course. My profession is a job of listening and sharing to ultimately accompany the winemaker in his (or her) goal of revealing the terroir.  Everything starts in the vineyard, without beautiful grapes in impeccable health nothing is possible.  That is why I privilege organic farming and a majority of estates I work with are going in this direction.

I want each wine to be an expression of its terroir. The only way in which the wines should resemble one another is in their fine quality. I am a man of the Mediterranean, and I firmly believe in the identity of our wines, the wines of the Mediterranean basin, their terroir and especially in their diversity.

I don’t underestimate the degree in which “psychological support” is important. In any endeavor, in order to begin to succeed one must feel supported.

I’m not David Copperfield. You cannot make great wine without terroir, without a dedicated winemaker, without the right climate, and especially without passion.

The problem is that there are too many oenologists that believe they know everything there is to know about winemaking.  But wine culture is acquired throughout not only one’s life but also the lives of future generations. Wine is not a mere beverage.  It is a page of our civilization and cultural history.

My job is simply to guide and assist the winemakers down their own path.  Maybe think of me as a rugby coach.  Like with any profession, the job of a coach can be interpreted in several ways. For me the best manner is to trust the potential of each player, allowing him to develop his qualities and express them to the fullest.  A coach never plays the games, there are only players on the field.  Too many oenologists seem to have not understood this yet.

 

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